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, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
level that the last government only introduced before the election. keeping our promise on winter fuel payments, taking all of those steps and making sure, again, something never done by the party opposite that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business
not expect to witness an election won by overinflate. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson grittily be very goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of huge popularity. and many of our presidential elections, the candidates are in a fitted title to present themselves as the one capable of serving the country with the winner is walking off with the modern maturity. the customary wisdom that the campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate would be the better theater. is there really a difference between these two considerations? is it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on effectiveness during his first term versus the unknown leadership skills of the challenge
to do this by e elect trail means. they had to win an election. they weren't confidence about that. there was an incredible a. para military violence that went in to. and the results very uneven. thag how they went out of the union. what proceeded that? when you're in a meeting and everything unanimous. don't you get suspicious? i do. there was a lot of back story to how thigh pulled it off. other places the back story showed. in alabama the up country representative just charged they were being run out of the union with that democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia looked tat and said no ordinary farmer has voted for this. they have run us out of the union without the consideration of democratic process. i think it's interesting it's revealing what democracy was and innocent a slave regime in 1860. they called it a democracy. they sometimes often made the case what they wanted was a republican and democracy was mob of course sei. it was part of the reason they wanted out of the union. they didn't like the direction it was going. they had to play the game to get
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
to the election if they declare that he dies tomorrow which there is a rumor that they would do that actually going around now, that if he would be declared dead and they called an election within 30 days and the opposition won, meaning the sympathy vote for the candidate which is difficult after what we saw on december 16th and dhaka election we just talked about, chavez has 20 of 23 governors. 11 of the governors that were run by the chavez party are former military officials, including four ministers of defense, who are now governors of their respective states. several of them are all along the office of the control campaign list because of their work with the farc so we have a situation where people are in control of things, so that even if henry embrey de four e elected president in this election it's the opposite -- he's the head of the opposition who ran against chavez and got a 45% to 55% but we are talking about to the even if he was to win, he still would have institutions that are controlled by the chavez government including the supreme court which we just pointed out, including t
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
are up for re-election in north carolina or out west or down south or wherever they're from, i don't think he can lift it. and can that's what i'm talking about in terms of overreach. if this was something where you said close the loophole on gun shows, catch the 40% of people who are going into the shows and escaping, buying guns if they're mentally disturbed and we should catch that and reasonable restrictions. the problem in the heller case and what d.c. was doing is they said you couldn't have a gun unless you registered it, but then today wouldn't let you register it. i mean, that's an effective you can't do it. and that does, in fact, go too far. so if it's a common sense -- and, you know, quite frankly, i don't know why ten. i don't know why somebody needs ten bullets, let alone thirty. so ten doesn't seem like some magic number to me. and, again, to the gun owners, that sounds like something somebody made up, ten. so i think that the president'stive orders -- executive orders can be accepted by the republican party, and if they did the incremental approach of background che
in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater, you see, who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom if his early, chaotic days, enforced some order and discipline on the blythe spirits who ran national review, expanded a conservative movement through the tv program "the advocates," husband newspaper column and his -- his newspaper column and his lectures and championed ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the actor-turned--politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor, bill buckley. of whom he once said, quote: the most exasperating people in the world are so off
the iranian or the midden eastern arab spring, and the american election, and the third is the pleasuring of -- blurring of fact and opinion. we lived in an era require to this where we thought there was a clear line between when journalists were presenting factual information from a neutral or fair perspective and when we were hearing opinions. that has broken down and those three changes we think have been driven by a variety of things, not the least of which is the technological revolution with we have undergone. >> host: professor, have we lost important gatekeepers of news in your view? >> guest: i think that is one of the central themes of the book, which is that we now live in a world that we call somewhat nerdly multiaxiality. what we mean by that term, the ways in which information can become public information and paid attention to by a lot of people is much more fluid, there are many more gates than there used to be. i argue you don't need gates because the walls have come down. so where we get information from, what becomes newsworthy or important, what goes
characteristic of a lot of our work. but we feel it was necessary. >> host: thomas mann, did the 2012 elections clarify anything? >> guest: by all appearances it was a status quo election returning us to the division of power; obama in the white house, democrats in control of the senate, republicans of the house. but appearances can be deceiving and in this case are. the most important reality of the election is that the republican effort to oppose anything and everything proposed by obama almost like a parliamentary party was not rewarded. taking the debt ceiling hostage was not rewarded, calling the obama health care plan -- which was their own only a few years earlier -- socialism was not reward withed. rewarded. that means they have to begin to rethink themselves and, importantly, democrats will not automatically embrace the same tactics in opposition. so i think that was the important change that creates a new dynamic not that's going to solve our problems. there's going to be no sitting around the campfire in washington making nice to one another. but the possibility now exists for a real
to be a watchdog. i used to say, what start in a lap dog. so that in changing the election of the commission, and even though later we were able to get some traction push the door, growing out of the 2000 election, the voters election, the commission has never been the same since that time. so reagan in the sense succeeded in making in the body that could not listen to ordinary people or that would not listen to ordinary people. not independent. they kept trying. the commissioners felt like they should just endorse whatever the administration felt. if you're going to do that, people appointed political appointees all over government his job is to do that. your job is to monitor them. right now all those other suppression activity that took place all across the country in the whole big debate about it, the civil rights commission should have been at the center of that debate based on its history, its experience with floating and voting rights suppression and making recommendations. it was nowhere to be seen. and so what it has done is subverted the mission that was supposed to have. what it n
. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal elections is good. but you don't have 50% of women on corporate boards or financial institutions. surveys suggest instituting financial sanctions against companies that did not address these differences. the u.n. committee went to germany 2004, demanded that the federal government had conduct a study on my fathers are not without and to parental leave. it's not just a state policy. it's a national policy. there's not many men taking advantage. why is in a quick sweat as you and start having a qu
system for medicare. that was, you know, pretty much trounced during the election. but we'll see. you need something with big numbers in order to -- [inaudible] more or less it's probably a smaller debt ceiling increase. and they also need to decide what to do about two other fiscal cliffs that are looming, the $85 billion in sequester cuts that had been put off for two months for the fiscal cliff deal and also the continuing resolution, government funding runs out march 27th. and if a bill's not passed, the government will shut down. now, some thought that republicans would be more willing to use that weapon to try to force cuts because a government shutdown is several orders of latitude less serious than a debt ceiling default. but, you know, behind the scenes appropriators have been working out their differences, and they could act quickly if leadership decided they didn't want to use that weapon to sort of pass the bill. >> l and finally, eric wasson, you report that the white house has sold paul ryan, the house budget chairman, that its budget will be late, missing the deadline.
political seers? >> you get elected officials you deserve, and i know this. i'm a politician. they respond to pressure and respond. so we always push the attention to washington or to trenton, albany, or city hall, but we can organize. we have the power to exercise pressure, demands, influence on our elected officials. .. >> when kids stand up in certain neighborhoods and kids stand up in more affluent neighborhoods s and they say those words, "liberty and justice for all," that phrase should be a command, should be a compelling aspiration. and there should be a conscious conviction amongst us to make that real. but right now we are lacking that sense of urgency. and we can't sit around and wait for elected leaders to do it, because when i think about great movements in america, i don't really think that they were led by elected officials. elected officials were often responding to the pressure or responding to the leadership on the ground. and that's really what we should be doing. when we're thinking about voting, conversations, debates, how can we have an entire presidential debate, and
ago written about and talked about is people up for election and trying to sell books? is this an inevitable outgrowth of our culture who talks about these issues this way? >> guest: to a large extent, yes. if you look historically, it hasn't changed much over even the last two years. this kind of propagandists use of history, even while the district was being made, people were very propagandists. what jefferson before they were dead and what they meant. so yes, i do think that is part of the genre and it didn't part of the genre needs to be people like me writing correct is insane if this is where you're getting your history, it's wrong. if not wrong, at least much more complicated than inflate it to be. >> host: that make touchy about this point of being complicated. let's say they have copy editors who said that of the founders, they said many of the founders said something that most of the founders or was a common opinion at the time. with that simple change of phrasing be enough to satisfy you? or is there a deeper concern? >> guest: that would totally come in dom
said i know but if he is american that means when he is elected president that means you all get a visa. [laughter] he said that. with the allegations that have only gotten worse with time, it is hard to say there is not proved that they are wrong there mostly based with paperwork for filings with the irs. then eyes way business is conducted in this country that at least there are five main agencies so normally when you have done something wrong if somebody goes to look for you have a paper trail. he seems to be caught up in that. when you talk to wyclef, a lot of people to agree he does have big dreams and he does want his organization to help life get better but that organization has been shut down. i don't know if there will be a criminal follow-up but it is pretty ugly. things did not turn out well in the end. >> with all the problems that occurred during katrina, why do think they did not do a more effective job with the engagements the president bush and clinton? that is a very good question. basically this is not the first time aid has gone wrong or not done what it was set out t
corrupted by the athens. it is an f. us that aims for at political and social elected us in on the one hand, and moral anarchy on the other. you cannot win, but they can make us all losers. to meditate on the meaning of this great contest, we've assembled a distinguished panel of chambers intellectual and moral affairs. you berkowitz is the current senior fellow at the hoovery/ institution where he chairs theo hoover task force on national security and law, and co-chairsk the hoover task force on the virtues of a free society. in the past he served as an associate professor at george mason university school of law, and an assistant and associate professor at harvard university. he is the author of virtue and the making of modern liberalism. he holds a jd and a ph.d inñs political science from thisvç institution, an m.a. from hebrew university of jerusalem, and a ba in english literature from swarthmore college. norman podhoretz -- i feel silly introducing these people -- norman podhoretz served as editor-in-chief of "commentary" magazine from 1960-1995, and is their current editor at larg
we please those people who will enable us to stay here? looking at the next election to a greater and stronger. then looking at your up of office and have you do what is best for the country in the long term regardless of how affects your political career. >> is that in your view a form of corruption? >> no, i don't think it is corruption. i think it is natural human nature. the people of congress are great people by and far. well-intentioned. they love our country. they want what is best for the country, provided they can still have a say in it. and so you get the natural tension of doing what is best for the country, even though it hurts my political career. and that's a pretty tough decision. only very courageous people will do that routinely. you know, when your desire is for position and power and the original desire was well intentioned and well-meaning and you confuse or rationalize that position against standing outside of that and looking, if i was not partisan, if i was not in a political position, will be the best position to the country those to be conflicted because o
of the national hispanic leadership agenda and guest of the speaker. jeff al jazeera, governor elect, national press club speaker committee member who organized today's event. and michelle who is a national spokesperson of hispanic journalists. until yesterday. [applause] before becoming the mayor of los angeles, the 41st mayor, during his youth he became a farmworker volunteer and activist leading student walkout. this led him on the path taking him state assembly. also city hall and the inner circle of the democratic national committee, where he chaired the 2012 convention in charlotte. regarding the topic of immigration, mayor antonio villaraigosa has said that the time is now to pass comprehensive immigration reform. he has slammed congress for doing nothing on the issue. yet on sunday on face the nation he said he was heartened that republican senator john mccain and others have been discussing solutions. given the country's current fiscal fights, is it realistic to expect immigration anytime soon so how does the mayor feel about local immigration initiatives? well, immigration is not the
on what should be done. but you have obviously probably more than any group of elect officials, thought about this issue more intently and longer. you've done great deal of work on this, all you've who deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands but i bed if i did a lot of people would put the hand up: how many of you mayors have had to attend the funeral of a police officer or an innocent child in a drive-by shooting or a shop owner in your city. many of you have had to attend, and some of you many, too many, such funerals. some of you represent communities that hear experienced mass shootings, not just in schools but in movie theaters and temples, and it's not unique to big cities and urban areas, as we now know. it was pure companiens dense i happened to be literally probably turn out to be a quarter mile ', back in 2006, at an outing, when i heard gunshots in thewoods that we didn't know -- we thought they were hunters. got back to the clubhouse and saw helicopters. it was a shooting that had just taken place in a small amish -- small -- small amie, scho
to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host: my enemy's enemy is my friend. you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: well, for me looking back it wasn't that difficult a choice because i knew i wasn't going to go into the military. >> host:
player, you're trucking a lot of chickens. and so bill clinton got punished. he didn't get elected to be governor when he ran again x then he reformed -- and then he reformed as far as tyson was concerned. so he has had the support of tyson ever since then. so when the clinton administration came into office, they facilitated the first stage of privatizing meat inspection which we have been living with ever since and which now the obama administration is trying to take a step further. the clinton administration privatized it in the processing, you know, meat -- animals are slaughtered, and then they're sent to another step where they're cut up and processed and packaged. so in the processing there's been this privatized system that we've done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is at food and water watch. now the obama administration wants to increase this program especially for poultry, and it would mean that more than 200 birds a minute are being sent, are being slaughtered in a plant. that's not a misstatement, 200 birds a minute. they whiz down the line, there's no way that
to change it, but the election as president of bolivia who as you know marks the real turning point in bolivia's's relations in the international community, and in terms of the government's policy towards the coca leaf. basically the administration adopted that coca yes, cocaine no approach. they eliminated the force to ratification strategy that had led to so many human-rights violations, social conflict and replaced that with a program of voluntary social control which has actually had better results than the previous policies and a better results than in neighboring peru. in 2011 there was a 13% decrease in the production in that country according to the to this government. but with regards to the international convention the government began a campaign to try to correct this historical error and the first thing they did with everyone agreed with was to try to amend the 61 convention by removing the two sub paragraphs that basically say it needs to be abolished in the 25 year period that has now patched some years ago. they simply wanted to delete those paragraphs. without any ob
't get elected to be the governor when he ran again. and so he has had support of tyson ever since then. when the clinton administration came into office, they facilitated privatizing meat inspection. now the obama administration is trying take a step further. the clinton administration privatized it in the processing. animals are slaughtered and then they go through another step where they are cut up and processed and packaged. in the processing, privatized system and we have done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is. now the obama administration wants to increase the program, especially for poultry. more than 200 birds a minute of being sent in slaughtered. that is not a misstatement. 200 birds a minute. there is no way there can be any inspection and these are immigrant workers doing extremely dangerous work. people sense that sliced, all sorts of horrible injuries. because of all of the contamination from salmonella, i can't really eat chicken. dip the chicken into chemicals and not really originated with the clinton administration. >> i don't know how much time we have. are th
, the latino vote very important in getting obama re-elected, and now, you know, the event that the republican party, it seems, that they really do need to change their thinking with latinos, and the issue important to us like immigration. i am very excited about, you know, the way the country is looking at latinos and to realize that, you know, we are an important part of the society. we need to work hard to create immigration reform to help those here to definitely move up, and to become an important power in politics and sectors of the society. very exciting times. >> host: speaking of the 2012 vote and latino vote, did you vote for president obama? are you a citizen today? >> guest: i am a citizen today, yes, aam. >> host: did you support president obama for re-elect? >> guest: i did, i did, i voted for him. >> host: can you tell us why? >> guest: i voted for him because, first of all, di not like the way romney spoke about latinos, about immigrants in general, about what he wanted to do with the immigrant population. i did north support that at all, and i do think that obama is doing thin
and i've gotten a lot of -- books only been out since tuesday, a week after election day. but it's got lots of reviews, and all the reviews made it sound as if i have done a hatchet job on this guy. and maybe i have, because his behavior towards jewish americans, his behavior during the war, his behavior as a ruthless businessman was not something to be celebrated. and i certainly don't celebrate it in the book. >> i wonder if you could comment on -- [inaudible]. hasn't bowled well with the people in america for protesting against catholicism? and let me add a little bit more. if i could comment -- [inaudible]. >> in 1960, jack kennedy would have come if jack kennedy, if jack kennedy had been protestant he would have gotten 54, 55% of the vote against nixon. congressional democrats got 54.5% of the vote in 1960. jack kennedy got 50.1% of the vote. millions of white protestants who otherwise voted democrat did not vote for jack kennedy because he was a catholic. kennedy's presidency changed, i think, the dynamic of electoral policy come up national electoral politics in this count
better, make an issue with their elected officials. i have some policy recommendations at the end of the. i hope people will look at this recent. >> the former head of the fdic, sheila bair on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns." sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> next comic kansas governor sam brownback delivers his third state of the state address. in his remarks before the joint session of the house and senate, he gave his plans for balancing the state budget which faces a projected shortfall of $267 million for the fiscal year beginning july 1. this event in topeka is 25 minutes. >> good evening. mr. speaker, madam president, -- [applause] you jumped my laundry now going to have to repeat. you will have to do that again, i hope. i was just looking at her thinking there's a lot of new faces here. welcome. good to have you in the legislature. it's going to be a great you and they do have before i get started one quick big announcement. next year at this time the capital renovation will be complet
, at the 16th of january, we have 28 finally deaths. when i became mayor, when i first put my election, and mexico the term is usually three years. my state is the only state that lasts for years. we decided we needed to change the model and made that a partnership and assign the retired general to become chief of police. a couple of months into the new administration, we had the police force, police officers didn't want to work with the general. and of course we were wondering if it had to do some with low wages for the betterment of the working conditions. the strike was orchestrated and they didn't want to work under a military chief. we have to take a very tough decision because there was something totally out of our hands. what we did is we decided to fire and to disappear the police officer department. of course after they heard i had taken the decision to disappear, they decided to go back to work and we justify one condition. you can go back to work if you do three things. number one. number two coming take a polygraph and number three can be said that due to an economic invest
on this inaugural weekend for months and in some cases up to a year beforehand preparing for whomever is elected in november. and as someone who participated in the inaugural for president obama four years ago and we had absolutely no idea what we were doing, i can tell you that the folks at the jsic regardless of who the chair is and the folks at jtf are there ready for you when you walk in the door and really do a lot of the logistical lift on this. it's really more our job just to make sure the president ice kind of imprint is put on some of these events. one of the ways we do that is in the parade, as the colonel mentioned, along with all these military elements there are 58 different groups, 58 different groups, floats and vehicles. these are from all 50 states. they are everything from the virginia military institute just across the river in virginia down in southern virginia which has marched in a number of inaugural parades all the way through a group, one of my favorites, a group from maine of unicyclists that will be joining us. i believe they are called -- let me get the name right --
if they are interested. there is a special election coming up. there is one get it running on the green party platform which says, stop the war on drugs and normalize recreational drugs. i do have some petitions that you can sign later. >> the question is what do we do . from a policy perspective, if you don't -- how many people have communicated with their elected officials to express their views on any subject? good. to allow the people in this country, however, don't. think there's nothing i can do to do this. when i was in high school and a good civics teacher. i was toddies of the three branches of government, their power as commander java's to show up and vote. if you are upset about something, write a letter. in fact a mother is a whole toolbox of things we can do at the local level to make tremendous amount of leverage if you know how to build effective coalitions, how to communicate with legislators effectively. history is made by those who show up. it pretty much guarantees things won't change. on the other hand if you start learning how to do these things to ask for meetings with representa
during the election was the time when obama had to come houston and talk explicitly about race. >> host: in philadelphia. >> guest: right here in philadelphia. one of the ironies -- so many ironies but one of the powerful ones is the first black president actually is a person who can talk least about race. for him it's a third rail for everyone, it's the third, fourth, and philadelphia rail for him. there's something about race he knows he can't discuss, and part of what he tried to do in that moment was to say, let me say something i think is going to bring people together that is forward thinking and hopefully i'll never have to bring it up again. in some ways it's paranoia. the idea is americans for fatigued about race. so resistant to thinking about racial inclusion, that to even bring up the idea of race too often, folks are going to disqualify you from the highest office in the land and you're not going to be a president for all americans. the positive is there are ways to address all kinds of differences that don't invoke race but brings everyone in. that's a nice model. we don't
he's planning to be elected the attorney general of arkansas, then the governor of arkansas and president of the united states. this is something that everyone who knows him knows about and they talk about all the time. it's not from the university of arkansas, she goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes the arkansas candidate for the fallujah that goes to oxford. he is an incredible success everywhere but he cannot handle the sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women his mother directed him him to that are the duty queens and attractive and that really is where his eyes had been. so this comes back to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham.
. [laughter] said this book stands with the actual election. since then camorra talked a lot about it why the republicans lost. i actually wrote a poem about back, which has called republicans soul-searching, were searching our souls and wondering why we got beat so badly our rivals are gloating. it's obvious now where our campaign went wrong. we should have prevented more people from voting. [laughter] and there was one very that the problem was as romney church victories the center, which is traditional in american politics that you appeal to the base of the party in the primary to the center. and he did try to move to the center. the second debate i wrote a poem called from abc's sword into shares and the third debate when he moved further, he said from abc shares into feather duster's. [laughter] and one of the theories is while he did the -- did that come as some people the party were preaching things most americans didn't believe in. todd akin, for instance. i did a poem called the female reproduction system, a lecture by todd akin. [laughter] a member of the house committee on scie
. this was a japanese soldier who elected to stay in the jungle after the war was over. the island of guam and he stayed there with another guy until 1960. he came out 15 years after the end of the war and went back to japan as a hero and had a movie made about him and all that. by a quirk of faith i happened to find his long-lost diary actually here in washington. i went to return it to him some years later and he came back to guam and i met him and gave him back his long-lost diary out it was a very emotional thing as you can imagine. >> you looked at prisoners from the allied side in the japanese. how were they treated differently and where they treated differently? >> yes they were treated very differently. the americans of course were treated very brutally, not much food comp and not much medicine, hard labor and a lot of physical beatings. and the japanese military training which thought it was disloyal to surrender. so these american p.o.w.s were considered not honorable men and they were treated that way. on the other hand of course the u.s. treated the japanese prisoners in accord with the gene
and was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and service the senate minority leader. under the current administration he was under the agency for international development and was elected to the house in 1980 to four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010, he won the battle of chairman of the ways and means committee. there is no embargo and breakfast is over except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the sessions session for at least two hours after the represent. to help c-span, if you happen to be sitting there microphone and you ask a question, pullet close to you. if not, they will come around you with a boom microphone. finally, if you send me a signal, i will do my best to answer questions and comments. >> thank you all for joining us. i was thinking yesterday as i was listening to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all
room. the truth is that fun untranslated longer than we should have. but as the next election cycle with the public interest has 30 taken in economic toll on what could have been because the bottom line is not only do we put these policies in place, we have to be thoughtful about how we do them. when we talk about spinning, we think about how we not only bring spending down, but we just cannot reprioritize. our budget completely emphasizes consumption. when we talk about revenues, there's no question within a shia population you have to bring in my revenues than in the past. if you do the same outdated anti-competitive tax system, to choke your economy. they seize the opportunity and are both on individual and corporate side to open up our economic system, you can do this in a way good for the economy. we approaches is to make and should give ourselves the time and thoughtfulness to put policies in place to do with the deficit that help in addition to the stability of god was going to happen in promoting economic growth. >> let me pick up on one piece of data from health care. as yo
any group of elected officials thought about this issue more intently and longer. you get a great deal of work. all of you deal with the issue every day. i'm not going to ask for a show of hands, but i benefited off a lot of people who put their hands up in this room. if i were to say how many of you plan to attend a funeral of a police officer or innocent child in a drive-by shooting or shop owner in your city, many of you come in many of you have had to attend and some of you, too many such funerals. some of you that communities have experienced my shootings not just in schools, but movie theaters and temples and it's not big cities or urban areas as we now know. it was for your comments and insight happen to be literally probably turn out to be a quarter of a mile back in 2006 at an outing when i heard gunshots in the words that we didn't know -- we thought they were hunters. we got back to the clubhouse and saw helicopters. it was issued in better had just taken place -- excuse me, a small amish school outside pennsylvania. so it's not just big cities for new suburbs. it can happen
of the political dynamics on the hill, a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins, and the president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done? >> you know, we have a system that is incremental in nature. we are not a parliamentary system where if you control the government you can move very quickly and the pendulum swings aggressively. american politics has played on the 40-yard line and that's especially true during a time where you have a divided government. both sides feel very, very strongly about their positions. but there is a deep identity of interest here that i think leads to agreement, or should lead to agreement. the identity interest is this. the president of the united states, there are two events which you know may occur in the next come in this next four years which could totally derailleur capacity of the of the things you want to do about the nation, your agenda. the first is that terrorists with a weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been very aggressive in trying -- that issue and his
was elected to the michigan state senate in 1964 and served as the senate minority leader. during the carter administration, he was assistant administrator of the agency for international development. he was elected to the house in 1982, four years after his brother carl was elected to the senate. in march 2010 representative levin won the gavel as chairman of the ways and means committee. thus ended the biographical portion of the program, now on to the thrilling process portion. as always, we are on the record. please, no live blogging or tweeting, in short, no filing of any kind when the breakfast is underway. there's no embargo when the breakfast is over, except that c-span has agreed not to use video of the session for at least two hours. pull the microphone close to you, if not, they'll come around with a boom mic. finally, if you'd like to ask a question, please to the traditional thing and send me a subtle, nonthreatening signal. i'll do my best to call on one and all. we'll offer representative levin the opportunity to make some opening remarks. thank you, sir, for coming. >> thanks
the counter. it can get doctors to prescribe things. i went and got medicine. electing a demint who cured but with the case of diarrhea in madrid. that the distinction if there ever was one. later on he was thinking me for this. the phone rang. it picked up a bit of sure this person is speaking spanish. i picked it up. it was a spanish press the minister . basically a persecute person. in fact, he was going to the conference the next day in into them. a committee he called there. he said amelya would like to come upstairs to treat peptic fall. a said, but you don't want to do this, but it wouldn't be a really think to do the things he's of a protestant minister. so if you would just treat him it would be -- he would be doing a very kind act. i will let him stay more than a minute he said okay. a tall the minister, clusters. he sees instead of in the small room in his appearance. and the minister, of course, being spanish, he hesitates for a moment. did he rushes across the room and gives him a giant the back with more and had never experienced before. on the forget the look. he's looking
was elected president. that's what i decided i've got to do this book. i had written a few pieces for the "washington post" before that, so i had some basis of research, particularly on his mother. and i think that when i get home from this incredible kenyan journey, i'll have the kenyan and kansas side of the story pretty much completed. and that's when the story begins, interweaving to incredible different worlds that helped create this person. >> who came up with the title of this book? >> i did. just bouncing around, out of africa, and then i said will come out of africa, out of hawaii, out of kansas, out of indonesia, out of chicago, out of this world. and so, the book is two things. it's the world that created obama, and then how he re-created himself. so the first -- i'm not sure of the proportions yet, and it will be important for me to get it right, perhaps even the first half of the book, or not quite that much, the main character isn't even on the stage yet. and then the second half of the book is largely in chicago, was also education, california, new york, boston thro
say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sure the proportions yet and will be important to get it right but perhaps even the first half of the book the main character isn't even on the stage yet and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when
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